South Asia Series: Pakistan’s #MeTooMovement

In January 2018, an unspeakable incident occurred in Pakistan involving a 7-year-old girl. Zainab Ansari was kidnapped by a man near the village of Kasur, south of Lahore. The perpetrator confessed that he lured Zainab with food, raped her, killed her, and left her body in a dumpster. Zainab’s body was found the next day, on January 5, 2018, in a garbage dumpster. 24-year-old Imran Mohammad pleaded guilty weeks after Ansari’s death. Mohammad was a neighborhood villager who knew the Ansari family.
The university has expressed a clear opposition to these strikes and walkouts. The university argues it does not want its faculty walking out on its students, compromising their education. However, students have argued that the best way to not compromise their education is for their professors to be best equipped to teach, putting it back on the administration.
In this week's Monitor Minute, Sufyan Shaltaf talks to Alia Bilal of IMAN-Chicago. In the podcast, they discuss the organization's beginnings, their various projects, and how the community can help make a difference in its success.
When men—or a group of men—collectively kidnap, torture, and rape a young eight-year-old girl, their crime is not merely rooted in their depravity. They were using Asifa’s body as a means to assault her cultural identity
In retrospect, my grandfather touts their entry and success thereafter as proof that the American dream is alive and well, cementing the Stars and Stripes as something that I should pledge my unwavering allegiance to. Even in the face of systematic racism or blatant discrimination within the immigration system, my grandfather would gently remind me that we should not be complaining. We are a sign that the system can and does work, and we should be grateful for the opportunities we have now.
In the aftermath of an incident of racial profiling by Loyola University Chicago’s Campus Police, along with the aggressive mishandling and arrest of two students of color, a group of student organizers have begun a movement entitled #NotMyLoyola to hold the police accountable and bring justice to students of color who have been profiling and attacked by Campus Police.
In The Chicago Monitor's new podcast, The Monitor Minute, host Sufyan Shaltaf introduces a new series, "Meet Chicago." In the first episode, he interviews Choya Webb, the program manager for Peer Health Exchange, Chicago.
“The whole thing. Our motto: a city he’ll never sleep in. We don’t want him, man.”
In the wake of an incident of racially profiling of students by Campus Police, the Loyola University Chicago student body has been up in arms to stand for justice for black and brown students. On Saturday, February 24, students protested the construction of a new athletic facility. At the same...
After witnessing a campus wide controversy at Wheaton College, filmmaker Linda Midgett set forth to address the differences and similarities in religion.
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